The Best AMD Graphics Card You Can Buy Right Now

Getting your hands on the best AMD graphics card can bring you into the 4k60 fps world with little damage to your pocket. As Team Red ramps up production on both their processors and GPUs, 2020 seems like the year to invest and upgrade your hardware to AMD. With the variety in products and the performance to start beating out NVIDIA when comparing price points, these are the best AMD graphics cards you can pick up right now.

With the ever-increasing demand for discrete graphics cards on the rise, AMD graphics cards like the AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT and AMD Radeon RX 5700 are becoming more popular thanks to their consistent stock levels and the price point being right in the sweet spot. Both outperform Team Green when it comes to the RTX 2060 super and is approaching the levels of RTX 2070, it may be the best time to pick up an AMD graphics card.

And with NVIDIA trying to lower prices just to keep up with AMD, this competition is ensuring that graphics cards get back to their once low prices before the big crypto surge in 2017.

Quick Tech Tips: Always ensure the rest of your hardware can keep up with your next graphics card. Your power supply should be able to put out enough power in wattage to give your system the juice it needs. And your monitor should fit the resolution you’re going for. No need to have a 4k compatible AMD graphics card when your monitor sits at 1080p.

Best AMD Graphics Card In a Quick Glance:

AMD graphics card clock speeds graph

Graph property of Matthew Marandola

  • AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT
  • AMD Radeon RX 5700
  • AMD Radeon VII
  • AMD Radeon 5500 XT
  • AMD Radeon 5700 XT
  • AMD Radeon RX 590
  • AMD Radeon RX 580
  • AMD Radeon RX 570
  • AMD Radeon RX 560
  • AMD Radeon RX Vega 64

AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT

The Best Bang for Your Buck

AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT in computer
Compute Units: 36 | Stream Processors: 2304 | Base Frequency: 1375 MHz | Boost Frequency: Up to 1750 MHz* | GPU Size: 7nm | Memory: 6GB GDDR6 (Newer Models) | Memory Clock: 14GHz (Newer Models) | Outputs: DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 4K60 Support

The best of the best, when it comes to current AMD graphics cards, is the AMD Radeon RX 5600 XT. The Radeon 5600 XT is one of the top contenders for entry-level high-end cards. It has even beat out the RTX 2060 Super from NVIDIA and caused Team Green to drop their prices on the card to even try and stay competitive. While there is no ray tracing available on this card or the deep learning supersampling that the competition has to offer, the features are used so few and far between that the extra money is hard to justify for the RTX 2060. Currently sitting at around $289.99 for the Sapphire Pulse version (currently rocking in my own set up), the price for performance is absolutely perfect.

AMD Radeon RX 5700

What the 5600 Should Have Been

Compute Units: 36 | Stream Processors: 2304 | Base Frequency: 1625 MHz | Boost Frequency: Up to 1725 MHz* | GPU Size: 7nm | Memory: 8GB GDDR6 | Memory Clock: 14GHz | Outputs: DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 4K60 Support

The initial big brother to the RX 5600, the AMD Radeon RX 5700 was to be considered the one up with better out of box clock speeds and offering more VRAM. Coming in solidly at a starting price of $329.99 and sitting around $40 more than the 5600 XT, the 5700 is a slightly better workstation graphics card. The card also hits that sweet spot if you’re rocking a 1440p monitor, being able to pump out plenty of frames on ultra settings for most games. This bad boy comes with the downside of getting pretty hot if you get the blower style. Look for ASRock or Gigabyte versions that use multiple fans and a heatsink.

AMD Radeon VII

AMD’s Best 4k Graphics Card

Compute Units: 60 | Stream Processors: 3840 | Base Frequency: 1400 MHz | Boost Frequency: Up to 1800 MHz* | GPU Size: 7nm | Memory: 16GB HBM2 | Memory Clock: 1GHz | Outputs: DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 4K60 Support

The first of the 7nm graphics cards released from AMD, the AMD Radeon VII was set to compete with Team Green’s high-end RTX 2080. It features some of the best 4k gaming experience for the price point and can pump out the best render times possible for work stations. Now that the graphics card has reached “end-of-life” (where a company stops producing the graphics cards), the price has fallen significantly. At the time of writing, an AMD Radeon VII is set at $595 compared to NVIDIA’s current RTX 2080 which is closer to on average $800. Looking for third party sellers and resellers makes this a perfect time to pick up an AMD Radeon VII as AMD gets ready to release new graphics cards at the end of 2020.

AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT

The Best Budget Workstation Graphics Card

Compute Units: 22 | Stream Processors: 1408 | Base Frequency: 1717 MHz | Boost Frequency: Up to 1845 MHz* | GPU Size: 7nm | Memory: 8GB GDDR6 | Memory Clock: 14GHz | Outputs: DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 4K60 Support

If you’re someone that loves to game and maybe enjoys streaming and uploading their videos to the web, the AMD Radeon RX 5500 XT is the best budget all-around card. It can easily pump out 60-90 frames at 1080p while still handling renders and editing stations at ease thanks to the increase of 8GB GDDR6 VRAM the card is able to handle. The price point is amazing, coming in at around $199.99 dollars, only slightly higher than the AMD RX 590. The increase in being able to handle higher graphics and better encode and render speeds makes it a better option for work stations than the RX 590. The biggest downfall of this product is thermal issues. It gets really hot thanks to its relatively high clock speeds, with less compute units and stream processors than the 5600 series and 5700 series.

AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT

The 5700’s “Hotter” Younger Sibling

Compute Units: 36 | Stream Processors: 2304 | Base Frequency: 1755 MHz | Boost Frequency: Up to 1905 MHz* | GPU Size: 7nm | Memory: 8GB GDDR6 | Memory Clock: 14GHz | Outputs: DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 4K60 Support

The “hotter” sibling of the 5700 series, the AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT was supposed to blow the socks off of its predecessor. While it did beat out clock speeds of the original 5700, the RX 5700 comes with the biggest downside of being extremely hot and extremely loud. Good luck trying to hear over the fans and while AMD Radeon software does let you control the fans to an extent, it still can be finicky. With that being said, the card runs extremely smoothly at 1440p and can even give an exceptional performance at the 4k mark. Sitting at $409.99, this graphics card would be considered a middle of the road budget.

AMD Radeon RX 590

Your Best Entry Level 1080p Graphics Card

Compute Units: 36 | Stream Processors: 2304 | Base Frequency: 1469 MHz | Boost Frequency: Up to 1545 MHz* | GPU Size: 12nm | Memory: 8GB GDDR5 | Memory Clock: 8GHz | Outputs: DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 4K60 Support, DVI-D

Considered the best option on the market for budget 1080p performance, you can comfortably run many games on high and ultra with little to no frame drop. The AMD Radeon RX 590 was considered the year after year upgrade of the AMD Radeon Rx 580. Offering decent clock speeds, a decent amount of VRAM at 8GB ( even though it is only GDDR5), and near-silent fans. The RX 590 is able to deal with moderate loads and is a great option for those that game on the low end and want to spend time working in Photoshop and the rest of the Adobe suite. It is currently sitting at around $179.99 and is a great option if you’re in a tight spot and strictly looking for gaming.

AMD Radeon RX 580

The RX 590’s Older Slower Sibling

Compute Units: 36 | Stream Processors: 2304 | Base Frequency: 1257 MHz | Boost Frequency: Up to 1340 MHz* | GPU Size: 12nm | Memory: 8GB GDDR5 | Memory Clock: 8GHz | Outputs: DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 4K60 Support, DVI-D

The precursor to the RX 590, the AMD Radeon RX 580 is nearly identical in specs to the RX 590. The RX 590 was simply considered a refresh of the RX 580 with higher clock speeds. These lower clock speeds meaning that the thermals are slightly better than the 590, and having personally started out with this graphics card, it is a great introduction to discrete graphics cards. The small compact build makes it great for smaller cases and still manages to scrape 60fps at 1080p. Keep in mind this will most likely be at medium to high settings. With that being said, if you have an old AMD Radeon RX 580 sitting around with nothing better to do, the 580 is one of the best for crypto mining. While a complicated process to set up, it can be a way to earn a few extra bucks a month. The RX currently sits at around $169.99. I would simply save an extra $10 and grab the RX 590.

AMD Radeon RX 570

Best VR Ready On a Budget

Compute Units: 32 | Stream Processors: 2048 | Base Frequency: 1168 MHz | Boost Frequency: Up to 1244 MHz* | GPU Size: 12nm | Memory: 8GB GDDR5 | Memory Clock: 7GHz | Outputs: DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 4K60 Support, DVI-D

If you’re looking to upgrade an older PC to keep up with the ever-evolving tech like Virtual Reality and don’t want to pump out the money for a whole new PC, then the AMD Radeon RX 570 is a great option for you. Offering lower compute units, stream processors and clock speeds, the AMD Radeon RX 570 was designed to be the cheapest entry-level into 1080p gaming and VR ready technology. Keep in mind, with these lower speeds, you will have to knock down the settings to medium for most games and even possibly low for VR. But it will be playable without extreme skipping and your older PC should be able to keep up. The AMD Radeon RX 570 currently sits at $150, making it the best VR ready graphics card on a budget.

AMD Radeon RX 560

Best Form Factor GPU Under $150

Compute Units: 16 | Stream Processors: 1024 | Base Frequency: 1175 MHz | Boost Frequency: Up to 1275 MHz* | GPU Size: 12nm | Memory: 4GB GDDR5 | Memory Clock: 7GHz | Outputs: DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 4K60 Support, DVI-D

This small form factor graphics card makes the AMD Radeon RX 560 a great choice for those really tiny PC builds. The GPU produces decent clock speeds like the RX 570 but will run hotter due to the lack of cooling in this GPU as well as the decrease in processors trying to pump out the same performance. The RX 560 produces moderate performance and you can expect it to still hit the 60 frames per second mark. But I would not expect any stellar VR capabilities or any great quality frames past medium. But for just over $120, it makes it hard to not choose when putting together a form factor build or utilizing an older PC that does not have the same space as mid-towers and full-towers.

AMD Radeon RX Vega 64

AMD’s Original Workstation Graphics Card

Compute Units: 64 | Stream Processors: 4096 | Base Frequency: 1247 MHz | Boost Frequency: Up to 1546 MHz* | GPU Size: 14nm | Memory: 8GB GDDR5 | Memory Clock: 1.6GHz | Outputs: DisplayPort 1.4, HDMI 4K60 Support

If you were looking for an amazing workstation graphics card in 2017, the AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 was your card. Offering some of the highest compute units and stream processors at the time, this graphics card could handle any render or encode that was thrown at it at the time. And as with most tech, it can still compete with some of the other graphics cards on the market at its current age. The AMD Radeon RX Vega 64 is considered end-of-life as well and is no longer produced. However, going to a reseller and grabbing one for around $660 makes it a great workstation GPU on a budget until the Radeon VII drops more in price and is regularly in stock.

Keep Your Other Computer Parts Up to Date

Bottlenecking is one of the curses of putting together a PC with some high-end products and some low-end products. Don’t cheap out on a power supply for the higher-end graphics cards. I would consider a 750w to be sufficient, but the more the better in this case. If you’re looking for a graphics card that has PCIe 4.0, but your motherboard only supports PCIe 3.0, then you’re not maximizing your GPU’s potential.

Regardless of the graphics card you go for, Team Red is currently releasing updates for the bios every day and giving these GPUs the competition that NVIDIA has been lacking in the last few years. Keep your eyes out as AMD looks to release their new RDNA 2 GPU’s under the codename “Big Navi”, which are said to completely rival Team Green and their ray tracing.

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